DAVID CHILDS / SOM

A modern architectural landmark that soars
92 stories above and beyond.

The penthouses at 35 Hudson Yards
The penthouses at 35 Hudson Yards
“The handsome limestone transforms this elegant
tower into an incredibly inviting home.”

— David M. Childs, FAIA, 
Architect, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP

At home in Hudson Yards

David M. Childs, FAIA, of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP, has added a warm and luxurious feel to this handsome building, incorporating limestone piers and graceful curves, which appear like sails reflecting the panoramic views of the Hudson River, the iconic Manhattan skyline, and its distinctive new Hudson Yards neighbors. The building is conceived holistically, with a striking series of setbacks that twist around the tower, expressing fluid movement and presenting opportunities for terraces with outdoor gardens that encircle the tower as they ascend.

Dedicated entrance for residents of 35 Hudson Yards
Dedicated entrance for residents of 35 Hudson Yards
A Higher Standard of Luxury
35 Hudson Yards residential entrance, located directly on the Public Square and Gardens

Skidmore, Owings & 
Merrill LLP/David Childs

The design of 35 Hudson Yards, the tallest residential tower in the neighborhood, is led by David M. Childs, FAIA, of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP. Arguably the greatest skyscraper architect of our time, SOM is known for an extensive roster of prestigious international projects, including the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai; One World Trade Center; and Time Warner Center.

Burj Khalifa, Dubai
Burj Khalifa, Dubai
One World Trade Center, New York
One World Trade Center, New York
David Childs
David Childs

THE LIMESTONE

Hand-selected limestone facade from the
Kaldorf quarry in Bavaria, Germany.

 

Limestone
Willibaldsburg Castle in Germany was built using Jura limestone

Jura Limestone

Jura limestone was selected for the iconic façade and comes from the Kaldorf quarry in Bavaria. The stone developed during the Mesozoic period approximately 180 million years ago and to date fossils of ancient creatures can be found preserved in the stone. This limestone's unique features make it particularly well suited for the New York climate. The quarrying of the stone dates back to the Roman Empire.